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Andrew’s work with the North Atlantic Humpbacks

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Andrew Stevenson (pictured left with Somers -10 and Elsa-16) started his research on humpbacks in 2007. His visual and acoustics data on the pelagic social behaviour of humpbacks as they migrate past Bermuda. was conducted between Feb 2007 and Feb 2010 while making the film "Where the Whales Sing". After completing the film he continued his research and wrote and illustrated "Whale Song" published in 2011. In 2019 he completed his second documentary, "The Secret Lives of the Humpbacks". Over March 2018 to September 2019 he obtained 18 months of acoustic recordings of the humpbacks 7 and 15 miles offshore.

 

Marine scientists know a lot about the humpbacks in their feeding and breeding grounds closer to shore, but there is little information on the humpbacks' mid-ocean migratory behaviour. As a mid-ocean platform, Bermuda provides a unique window into the lives of the humpbacks.

Please contact us at 777 7688 (spout@logic. bm) if you have any sightings of whales during the winter months up to March. Got photos of the underside of whales' flukes? ...email us at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

Andrew filming

Through exploration of Bermuda’s waters, research, data analysis and educational outreach-our mission is to promote an understanding of humpback whales to protect cetaceans' rights as a step towards conserving our marine environment.

We conduct our research under a Protected Species Licence for Scientific Research Activities Licence no. 14-11-22-15 issued by the Government of Bermuda, Department of Conservation Services.

Our aerial photography/videography is under aerial work permission given by the Bermuda Department of Civil Aviation and can be viewed on www.bermudaaerialography.com

Read more...
 

Summary Statistics to date:

Total fluke IDs for 2017: 140

Total fluke IDs for 2018: over 200!

Total fluke IDs for 2019: over 260!

Total fluke IDs for 2020: 100+ despite inclement weather and COVID-19

Total fluke IDs for 2021: 260+ despite inclement weather and COVID-19

Total individual fluke IDs 2007-2021: over 1,750!!!

Total resightings in different years: over 350
Longest layover in Bermuda: 21+++ days

Where the Whales Sing wins the "Best Emerging Underwater Filmmaker" award at the BLUE Ocean Film Festival in Monterey, California.  - read more....

Where the Whales Sing wins the Masterworks Museum of Bermuda Art Charman Prize for 2011- read more...

I have hundreds of hours of aerial and underwater footage available for puchase.Go to my website www.bermudaaerialography.com

 
A Lecoute des Baleines: Aux Bermudes, en compagnie des baleines a bosse Print E-mail

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My French whale book published in 2020 by Elytis in France illustrated with underwater photographs of whales and dolphins and aerial photographs of Bermuda.

For frequent updates on each season please go to the Facebook page with the link on the top left

 

The Book

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Exhibition Photographs

The whales sing, not because they have an answer, they sing because they have a song.

Click here for more whale song

Fast Fact

Each time a whale blows and inhales, the exhalation and inhalation takes only a second and a half. The air escapes at over 300 miles per hour resulting in a loud "pooooh" sound. If you listen carefully to blows, you can hear the whale exhale and then inhale. It sounds something like "poooooh.......fuut," the sound of a long exhalation and a quick inhalation. If you are downwind from a blow, especially when the whales are feeding, the smell is something like month-old fish.

Recognise this fluke?

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